Best Upcoming Economics Books of November 2016

  • The Road to Ruin: The Global Elites’ Secret Plan for the Next Financial Crisis
    The Road to Ruin: The Global Elites' Secret Plan for the Next Financial CrisisA drumbeat is sounding among the global elites. This time, the elites have an audacious plan to protect themselves from the fallout: hoarding cash now and locking down the global financial system when a crisis hits. The global elites don’t want this book to exist.
  • Thank You for Being Late: An Optimist’s Guide to Thriving in the Age of Accelerations
    Thank You for Being Late: An Optimist's Guide to Thriving in the Age of AccelerationsIn Thank You for Being Late, a work unlike anything he has attempted before, Thomas L. His thesis: to understand the twenty-first century, you need to understand that the planet’s three largest forces―Moore’s law (technology), the Market (globalization), and Mother Nature (climate change and biodiversity loss)―are accelerating all at once. These accelerations are transforming five key realms: the workplace, politics, geopolitics, ethics, and community.
  • The Great Convergence: Information Technology and the New Globalization
    The Great Convergence: Information Technology and the New GlobalizationThis triggered a self-fueling cycle of industrial agglomeration and growth that propelled today’s rich nations to dominance. The result is today’s Great Convergence. As The Great Convergence shows, the new globalization presents rich and developing nations alike with unprecedented policy challenges in their efforts to maintain reliable growth and social cohesion.
  • Unlikely Partners: Chinese Reformers, Western Economists, and the Making of Global China
    Unlikely Partners: Chinese Reformers, Western Economists, and the Making of Global ChinaWith Deng Xiaoping’s blessing, China’s economic gurus scoured the globe for fresh ideas that would put China on the path to domestic prosperity and ultimately global economic power. Chinese economists partnered with an array of brilliant thinkers, including Nobel Prize winners, World Bank officials, battle-scarred veterans of Eastern Europe’s economic struggles, and blunt-speaking free-market fundamentalists. Even today, Chinese Communists decry dangerous Western influences and officially maintain that China’s economic reinvention was the Party’s achievement alone.
  • How Will Capitalism End?: Essays on a Failing System
    How Will Capitalism End?: Essays on a Failing SystemThe provocative political thinker asks if it will be with a bang or a whimper In How Will Capitalism End. the acclaimed analyst of contemporary politics and economics Wolfgang Streeck argues that capitalism is now in a critical condition. The capitalist system is stricken with at least five worsening disorders for which no cure is at hand: declining growth, oligarchy, starvation of the public sphere, corruption and international anarchy.
  • The Fish Market: Inside the Big-Money Battle for the Ocean and Your Dinner Plate
    The Fish Market: Inside the Big-Money Battle for the Ocean and Your Dinner PlateGulf Wild ― the first seafood brand in America to trace each fish from the sea to the table ― emerged after grouper, the star of fried fish sandwiches, fell off menus due to overfishing. But the property rights that saved grouper also shifted control of the fish from public to private, forever changing the relationship between wild seafood and the people that eat it. Following seafood money from U.
  • The Innovation Illusion: How So Little Is Created by So Many Working So Hard [Read online]
    The Innovation Illusion: How So Little Is Created by So Many Working So HardTimely, compelling, and certain to be controversial—a deeply researched study that reveals how companies and policy makers are hindering innovation-led growth Conventional wisdom holds that Western economies are on the threshold of fast-and-furious technological development. Assessing the experiences of global companies, including Nokia, Uber, IBM, and Apple, the authors explore three key themes: declining economic dynamism in Western economies; growing corporate reluctance to contest markets and innovate; and excessive regulation limiting the diffusion of innovation. At a time of low growth, high unemployment, and increasing income inequality, innovation-led growth is more necessary than ever.
  • The Fourth Industrial Revolution
    The Fourth Industrial RevolutionEver-present, mobile supercomputing. This is what the fourth industrial revolution looks like, as dubbed by world renowned economist Klaus Schwab. This Fourth Industrial Revolution is, however, fundamentally different.
  • Econophysics and Financial Economics: An Emerging Dialogue
    Econophysics and Financial Economics: An Emerging DialogueEconophysics and Financial Economics provides the first extensive analytic comparison between models and results from econophysics and financial economics in an accessible and common vocabulary. Finally, this book provides a research agenda for a more fruitful collaboration between econophysicists and financial economists, creating new research opportunities. Econophysics and Financial Economics is an important step in creating a profitable dialogue between financial economists and econophysicists.
  • The Breaking Point: Profit from the Coming Money Cataclysm
    The Breaking Point: Profit from the Coming Money CataclysmJames Dale Davidson connects the dots. But hard financial times are ahead, and The Breaking Point will help you protect your wealth and prosper through it all. Providing a painfully clear view of the state of the global economy, outspoken economist James Dale Davidson uses the old-fashioned tool of argument—facts—to describe how governments have mismanaged the financial system to the point of no return.

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