The 11 Most Popular Economic Growth Books

  • Prosperity without Growth: Economics for a Finite Planet [Read online]
    Prosperity without Growth: Economics for a Finite PlanetIs more economic growth the solution. In this explosive book, Tim Jackson -a top sustainability adviser to the UK government- makes a compelling case against continued economic growth in developed nations. Economic heresy.
  • Australia’s Second Chance – From the author of The Australian Moment / EXPRES COURIER FROM SYDNEY WITH DHL/ UPS / FEDEX
    Australia's Second Chance - From the author of The Australian Moment / EXPRES COURIER FROM SYDNEY WITH DHL/ UPS / FEDEXMost nations don’t get a first chance to prosper. Now we’re back on top, in the position where history tells us we made our biggest mistakes. ‘ Tony Wright, Saturday Age.
  • China’s Economy: What Everyone Needs to Know® [Read online]
    China's Economy: What Everyone Needs to Know®China’s Economy: What Everyone Needs to Know® is a concise introduction to the most astonishing economic growth story of the last three decades. China’s growth has lifted 700 million people out of poverty. How long can its vibrant economy co-exist with the repressive one-party state.
  • Why Australia Prospered: The Shifting Sources of Economic Growth (The Princeton Economic History of the Western World) [Read online]
    Why Australia Prospered: The Shifting Sources of Economic Growth (The Princeton Economic History of the Western World)Why Australia Prospered is a fascinating historical examination of how Australia cultivated and sustained economic growth and success. These included imperial policies, favorable demographic characteristics, natural resource abundance, institutional adaptability and innovation, and growth-enhancing policy responses to major economic shocks, such as war, depression, and resource discoveries. McLean also considers how the country’s notorious origins as a convict settlement positively influenced early productivity levels, and how British imperial policies enhanced prosperity during the colonial period.
  • An Economy is Not a Society: Winners and Losers in the New Australia (Redback) [Read online]
  • An Economy is Not a Society: Winners and Losers in the New Australia (Redback)Economic growth above all else. Does it make our lives and our communities better. The fracturing of communities continues apace.
  • The Power of Just Doing Stuff: How Local Action Can Change the World [Read online]
    The Power of Just Doing Stuff: How Local Action Can Change the WorldPacked with real-life examples and the voices of people who have created innovative local businesses and invested in all manner of new enterprises, this call for local action argues that the seed of a new economy—and the answer to the desperate search for a new way forward in an increasingly economically insecure and ecologically unstable world—is an understanding by individuals that change starts with them. The aim of the Transition movement is to galvanize people into taking action, whether on a large or a small scale, with the goal of creating communities that model a local economy rooted in place, in well-being, in entrepreneurship, and in creativity. While the book is primarily focused on food production and sustainable energy, the practical applications it offers also address how to rebuild a local community in the face of austerity due to a natural disaster or economic collapse.
  • Why Information Grows [Read online]
    Why Information GrowsWhat is economic growth. To understand the growth of economies, Hidalgo argues, we first need to understand the growth of order. By uncovering the mechanisms that enable the growth of information in nature and society, Why Information Grows lays bear the origins of physical order and economic growth.
  • Collision Course: Endless Growth on a Finite Planet (MIT Press) [Read online]
    Collision Course: Endless Growth on a Finite Planet (MIT Press)The notion of ever-expanding economic growth has been promoted so relentlessly that “growth” is now entrenched as the natural objective of collective human effort. In Collision Course, Kerryn Higgs examines how society’s commitment to growth has marginalized scientific findings on the limits of growth, casting them as bogus predictions of imminent doom. Higgs tells how in 1972, The Limits to Growth — written by MIT researchers Donella Meadows, Dennis Meadows, Jorgen Randers, and William Behrens III — found that unimpeded economic growth was likely to collide with the realities of a finite planet within a century.
  • Unfinished Business: Paul Keating’s Interrupted Revolution
    Unfinished Business: Paul Keating's Interrupted RevolutionPenned by a veteran financial observer, this biography explores the story of Paul Keating’s resolve to reinvent the Australian economy. This account also depicts how the fulfillment of his vision was denied by his political opponents after the Australian people voted Keating out in 1996. It also sounds a timely warning that the failure to finish the job Keating started has left Australia’s newfound prosperity vulnerable, particularly in the current climate of international economic uncertainty.

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